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Last updated::2016-11-02    

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2016-10-27

View from Tea & Life Aspects—Tea-Tasting Activity for Foreign Students

By Taylor Tseng
Foreign students experienced the smell of Oolong tea and Bi-Lo-Chun (G.. Foreign students experienced the smell of Oolong tea and Bi-Lo-Chun (Green tea). Photo by Chen Ju-chih

At convenient stores or tea-drink stores, we can buy a variety of tea drinks, such as black tea, green tea, Tieh-Kuan-Yin, Chinhsuan, Pouchong tea, and so on. And they have become part of teenagers’ life. In order to help foreign students learn about Chinese tea culture, the Office of Student Dormitory Service invited Dr. Cheng-Nan Lai from the Tea Research and Extension Station, COA, to talk about “View from Tea & Life Aspects,” and provide the foreign students with an experience with unique characteristics of Taiwan teas and delicate tea culture, adding color to their dormitory life.

Prof. Roland Kirschner gave an opening speech for the activity, sharing with the students his knowing about tea. He said that in Europe, most people drink black tea, and that not until he came to Taiwan did he start to know how abundant the tea culture could be. It was his passion for Chinese culture and his acquaintance with Dr. Lai that made this activity possible.

Dr. Cheng-Nan Lai has been doing research in tea for over twenty eight years. He studied agricultural chemistry in college, and later studied agricultural extension and bioindustry. Having the knowledge in both natural science and social science is a great help for his later research and extension in tea.

Dr. Lai introduced the complicated cultivation and manufacturing process of tea, and the evolution of Taiwan tea industry, helping students have a deeper understanding of tea. He mentioned some of the tea contests held in Taiwan, which are aimed at promoting tea qualities and the tea culture. When it comes to the tea culture, the tea ceremony is the essence of the culture, as it combines the traditional culture and art elements, epitomizing the spirit of tea.

Dr. Lai also showed us how to make tea and taste it. He emphasized the importance of retronasal olfaction, which is the key to savoring the aroma. He hoped that, after this activity, the students would not regard tea as something with hot water brewing only, but as something with diverse aspects which is worthy of discovering.

Prof. Roland Kirschner, who has a great passion for Chinese culture, g.. Prof. Roland Kirschner, who has a great passion for Chinese culture, gave an opening speech. Photo by Chen Ju-chih The activity provided the foreign students with an experience with tea.. The activity provided the foreign students with an experience with tea, adding color to their dormitory life. Photo by Chen Ju-chih
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