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Last updated::2018-01-09    

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2017-10-06

Faculty and Students at the Graduate Institute of Space Science Re-write the Theories on Textbooks

This August, doctoral student Huang Guan-Han from the Graduate Institu.. This August, doctoral student Huang Guan-Han from the Graduate Institute of Space Science (GISS) of NCU with his advisors Dr. Lin Chia-Hsien, Associate Professor of the Institute, and Dr. Lee, Lou-Chuang, Academician of Academia Sinica, published an article that made a breakthrough on Scientific Reports.

This August, doctoral student Huang Guan-Han from the Graduate Institute of Space Science (GISS) of NCU with his advisors Dr. Lin Chia-Hsien, Associate Professor of the Institute, and Dr. Lee, Lou-Chuang, Academician of Academia Sinica, published an article that made a breakthrough on Scientific Reports. They analyzed the data of the solar magnetic field in the past 40 years and discovered a new pattern for the generation and development of the solar magnetic field. The diagram would evolve from a butterfly diagram to a serpentine diagram, adding a new page to old theories on textbooks.

From Butterfly to Serpentine Diagram: A New Discovery about Physical Mechanisms of the Sun

Many solar-related textbooks used to describe the magnetic polarity reversal cycle of the Sun with a “butterfly diagram,” which was drawn on the basis of the time maps of sunspot areas. The “serpentine diagram,” plotted and named by the NCU research crew, was based on the observation of the open magnetic field of the Sun. The new diagram was expected to make the explanation of the solar cycle more complete and make a step forward to new scientific knowledge.

In addition to the research on the periodic changes in the solar cycle, the research results can be further applied to space weather prediction. As we realize how the location and area of coronal holes (i.e. the open magnetic field) change with time, we could better predict the flow of high-speed solar wind and further prevent high-energy particles in solar wind from influencing the Earth’s magnetosphere and artificial satellites.

A Practical Academic Attitude Passing on Through Three Generations

Huang Guan-Han sorted out some previous studies to draw the coronal holes, and gradually developed his own research till now. Huang’s advisor, Dr. Lin Chia-Hsien, helped him develop the research into an article, and Huang turned to Academician Dr. Lee, Lou-Chuang for resolving difficult problems. The teachers and student jointly worked on such significant research, which best illustrated the inheritance of NCU academia.

 

“You should not be afraid of spending much time when doing research, and you must figure it out and do it right. If you feel that something is wrong, just go back and check,” said Dr. Lin. Her remarks pinpoint exactly the practical attitude toward scientific research. Huang Guan-Han also thanked Dr. Lee, Lou-Chuang for reminding him of the major issues and problems in his research. “Sometimes I would just focus too much on some insignificant details. Yet fortunately I have Dr. Lee, Lou-Chuang, who can always detect my blind spots and guide me to the core issues to find crucial scientific values,” said Huang.

In the photo, figures from left to right respectively are Dr. Lee, Lou.. In the photo, figures from left to right respectively are Dr. Lee, Lou-Chuang, Academician of Academia Sinica, Huang Guan-Han, doctoral student of the Graduate Institute of Space Science, and Associate Professor Lin Chia-Hsien.

Web:https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-09862-2

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