Academic News

A Breakthrough in Digital Optics: Department of Optics and Photonics Developed A Micro-Optical Imaging System

Posted on: 2020-09-07    
The Optical Sciences Center and the Department of Optics and Photonics at National Central University (NCU) co-developed a new micro-optical imaging system that allows the image resolution to reach the scale of the micrometer without using any lens.
The Optical Sciences Center and the Department of Optics and Photonics at National Central University (NCU) co-developed a new micro-optical imaging system that allows the image resolution to reach the scale of the micrometer without using any lens.

Imagine that in the future the camera on a smartphone is not only for taking beautiful photos but also serves as a microscope; viruses and bacteria have nowhere to hide. The Optical Sciences Center and the Department of Optics and Photonics at National Central University (NCU) co-developed a new micro-optical imaging system that allows the image resolution to reach the scale of the micrometer without using any lens. The research outcome was published on the latest volume of Scientific Reports, catching international attention.

 

 “The image formation mechanism of this technique is completely different from the traditional lens imaging mechanism. A light sensor will no longer serve only for forming traditional photo images but will detect object patterns with special information. With digital calculations of a computer, the shape and outline of the objects being photographed can be restored. This technique perfectly integrates digits with optics, making a novel breakthrough in digital optics!” stated Dr. Ching-Cheng Sun, Chair Professor of the Department of Optics and Photonics at NCU.

 

The advantage of the technology is that image formation can be completed with a much lighter and smaller device, getting rid of the devices of traditional imaging optics. If digital optics can further combine with portable devices, the imaging system will become one of the crucial developments of upcoming optical techniques in the information technology industry.

 

“The lensless imaging microscope not only adopts digital optical computing but also applies the technique of volume holographic optical components, a leading technique owned by NCU, to create unconventional optical components in replacement of traditional optical components in digital optics. Chances are that people in the near future may use smartphones to conduct professional imaging for detecting bacteria or viruses attached to their personal belongings and preventing themselves from the threats of infectious disease,” said Dr. Yeh-Wei Yu, Assistant Professor of the Department of Optics and Photonics at NCU.

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Last updated: 2021-07-07 Posted by: Academic News Visit counts: 1292